Prioritizing the Workload

DEVON ENERGY CORPORATION

www.devonenergy.com/careers/military-recruiting

Devon Energy Corporation is an independent energy company engaged in finding and producing oil and natural gas. The company is the second-largest oil producer among North American onshore independents. Devon is active in Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and Canada. Its 5,000 employees in the United States and Canada operate $50 billion in total assets, which generated operating revenue of nearly $20 billion in 2014. Devon is an S&P 500 company, and is headquartered in Oklahoma City.

The company has opportunities in engineering, geosciences, supply chain, information technology, and field operations. About 9 percent of all new hires at Devon have a military background – one of the highest percentages in Corporate America.

Devon has found that men and women with military experience are team players, focused on delivering results. They bring valuable skills and leadership experience to the job. Devon is a good fit for veterans because the company operates in a results-driven culture of accountability, clear expectations, and continuous improvement.

A VETERAN SUCCESS | OWEN OTTO THOMPSON JR.

Owen Otto Thompson Jr. has 22 years of military experience – 11 active-duty and 11 reserve – and achieved the rate of chief petty officer in the United States Navy. His main responsibilities in the military included serving as a unit chief, overseeing day-to-day operations of a fuels company.

Thompson is now a lease operator at Devon, operating and maintaining approximately 40 oil and natural gas well sites. He started working at Devon in 2012. He began as a substitute operator, and within 18 months had responsibility for his own group of wells.

A class he took in the military has direct application to what he does today. “While in the Navy, I welcomed the opportunity to take several classes and attained a number of technical certifications,” he said. “One of those was aircraft inspection – the detailed examination of complex mechanical systems to ensure safety. This is a valuable skill that I now apply to my work with oil and gas production equipment.” Because of that experience, he encourages servicemembers to take advantage of every educational opportunity they can while in the military.

Other skills that Thompson picked up in the service are also useful. “One major skill that I learned in the military was problem-solving, which I use every day in my current job,” he said. “Another skill is prioritizing my workload, which I also do every day.”

Integrity is also a major factor. “In my day-to-day job, I’m alone most of the time,” said Thompson. “When a person works alone, it is a must to have integrity. I learned how important integrity is while in the military, and I carry this over to my civilian life every day.”

Thompson believes his company finds the right fit for veterans. “I feel Devon is sharply focused on placing veterans in positions that enable the company to deliver results,” he said. “It’s all about business success, which is good for the people who work here.”

Patience is essential to finding a post-military career, according to Thompson. “My advice to anyone leaving the military is to get all the education you can, do your homework on companies you’re interested in, and be flexible and patient,” he said. “One key thing is to start your job search as early as possible.”

Friday November 13, 2015

This article appeared in the May-June 2015 issue of Search & Employ Magazine